News Articles

1st 2022 bison born at Rocky Mountain Arsenal

1st 2022 bison born at Rocky Mountain Arsenal

The first bison calf of the season has been born at the Commerce City wildlife refuge.
Located ten minutes from downtown Denver, RMA is home to a herd of more than two dozen bison as well as deer, raptors, songbirds, waterfowl, prairie dogs and coyotes.

Denver Parks and Recreation (DPR) maintains two conservation bison herds in the Denver Mountain Parks system at Genesee Park and Daniels Park.

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Heavy snow in Interior Alaska has Bison hanging out on plowed roads

Heavy snow in Interior Alaska has Bison hanging out on plowed roads

Kurt Schmidt heard the bison hooves smack on the car before he saw what happened. He’d been driving home from work on a small road near his Delta Junction home on a dark January night when he saw a herd of bison ahead. On the other side of the herd, a small car was also waiting to pass the animals. Schmidt said he stopped his pickup truck and waited. Suddenly, the herd turned around and ran. Several of the huge animals stumbled over the car. “I don’t think they intended to run over it,” he said. “They pretty much ran into it, slid up the hood and ran up over the top.” The car’s driver moved forward quickly after the incident, and Schmidt could see hoof marks on the dashboard less than a foot from the steering wheel. The event could have been a lot worse. Deep snow this winter has caused more bison to move onto plowed roadways in the Delta Junction area, said Bob Schmidt, a wildlife biologist for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. “The animals don’t want to get off the plowed...

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South Dakota Tribe Owns Largest Native-Managed Buffalo Herd

(From the Daily Yonder--serving rural news, Kristi Eaton March 17, 2022) Over the past two years, the Sicangu Oyate, also known as the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, has cultivated the largest Native-managed buffalo herd in the world.  There are currently about 750 buffalo in the herd, according to Aaron Epps, who was the start-up manager for the project, known as Wolakota. He is also the marketing and communications director for REDCO, the economic development arm of the tribal nation, headquartered in South Dakota.  “It’s an idea that’s been around, really, for generations, just due to the historical connection and spiritual and cultural significance of buffalo to the Lakota people,” Epps said in an interview with The Daily Yonder. “And so, the idea isn’t necessarily new, but we had a really unique opportunity to really actualize it and bring it about in a really unique way.” According to experts and historians, more than 30 million bison once roamed North America. As a source of meat and...

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Bison Processors Eligible for Meat Processing Assistance Grant

Facilities that process bison as a nonamenable species under the Agricultural Marketing Act will be eligible to apply for funding under USDA’s $150 Meat and Poultry processing Expansion Grant Program announced in February. Officials from USDA’s Rural Development Agency clarified that issue during a webinar providing an overview of the grant program. The clarification came as welcome news for the bison sector because the Request for Proposals announced in February stated that the funds were being made available for facilities that were approved under the Federal meat Inspection Act and the Federal Poultry Inspection Act.  As a nonamenable species, bison are processed under the Agricultural marketing Act. The allowance for bison to be eligible for funding is contained in the definitions of the grant proposal. The grants are being made available for meat processing facilities, and the RFP defines meat as, “Species amenable to USDA inspection including cattle, sheep, swine, goats,...

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Bison herd demolishes car, terrorizes driver; ‘they ran right over me’

(From For the Win) A bison herd trapped between vehicles heading in opposite directions and surrounded by dangerous icy snow along a snow-covered Alaskan road faced a no-way-out situation. After pausing, the herd turned around and stormed toward the headlines illuminating the roadway and terrorized the driver. The result was not pretty. Kurt Schmidt was videotaping the encounter and, though it was dark and you don’t see the destruction taking place, you definitely hear it. Make sure to turn up the volume. See the video at https://ftw.usatoday.com/2022/02/bison-herd-demolishes-car-terrorizes-driver-they-ran-right-over-me You can hear Schmidt say in the video, “They just trashed that truck.” Once the herd moved on, the driver in the demolished car approached Schmidt’s vehicle.  “How do you like my car?” the driver said.  “Yeah, what happened?” Schmidt replied. “I heard that.”  “The buffalo took out my car,” the driver said.  “Where did they hit you?” Schmidt said. “They ran right up...

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Most Meat Alternatives Contain ‘Excessive’ Amounts of Salt, Study Says

A recent study revealed that a significant number of vegan- and vegetarian-friendly alternative meat products have “excessive” levels of salt compared to their conventional meat counterparts.  As some consumers transition to more plant-based diets, food companies are hurrying to market meat substitutes that mimic the experience of traditional meat products. Soy-based burgers, chicken-less nuggets, and non-meat bacon and sausages are increasingly popping up on grocery shelves to meet heightening consumer interest. Often times, shoppers will reach for meat substitutes for health or environmental reasons, but those same consumers seeking a healthier diet may be surprised to find that meat substitutes often contain more sodium than the meat products they are designed to replace. According to the American Heart Association, high sodium diets can increase blood pressure which may lead to cardiovascular issues such as greater risk for heart disease and stroke. Recent data suggest that the...

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Mammoth Site wants Horn donations for trunk kits

Mammoth Site wants Horn donations for trunk kits

Education has always been a key component of the Mammoth Site of Hot Springs’ mission. To that end, the “Mammoth-in-a-Trunk” kits were created to bring the science of The Mammoth Site to schools across the country, at an affordable cost. Each “Mammoth-in-a-Trunk” kit contained materials for a class that taught concepts of varying complexity, from erosion and fossilization to what paleontologists can learn from a prehistoric animal’s teeth. Following this tradition, the “Bison-in-a-Box” kit will contain materials to teach students of all ages about bison, an animal that traces its origins to the Pleistocene. The kits will not only contain educational materials about the fossil history of bison, but also their importance in a modern context. Bison-in-a-Box will give students a chance to explore what makes a bison a bison, the relationship between bison and cattle, and what the fossils of bison can tell us about the Pleistocene environment. As with the educational kits we currently...

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Hundreds of volunteers gather for annual bison roundup at Antelope island

Over 220 volunteers on horseback gathered at Antelope Island in Davis County, Utah, last October for their annual bison roundup. Hundreds more folks came to watch. Robert DeRosa, who moved to Utah from New York City in 2020, brought his 12-year-old granddaughter to catch a glimpse of the bison herd. "You can’t do Antelope Island and miss the bison round up," said DeRosa. "I’ve seen a few before but never like this close," said DeRosa's granddaughter. Jeff Nichols has been a cowboy in the round up for at least nine years. "Where else can you herd buffalo?" said Nichols. "We’re a group that’s been born 100 years too late. We’re much more comfortable in this than we are in front of a computer screen.” Steve Bates, a wildlife biologist who has worked at Antelope Island for twenty years, said they had earlier used helicopters to bring in the bison, but they learned real cowboys and cowgirls are better for the buffalos’ health. "With the horses, there’s stress involved but not near to the...

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It’s a Girl! Bison Herd at Wanuskewin Heritage Park Welcomes New Member

It’s a Girl! Bison Herd at Wanuskewin Heritage Park Welcomes New Member

Wanuskewin Heritage Park welcomed back Plains buffalo on Jan 17, 2020 after nearly 150 years since bison grazed on the land where the Park now stands—on the outskirts of Saskatoon. Elder Cy Standing of the Wahpeton Dakota Nation welcomed eleven plains bison to their ancestral home on the outskirts of Saskatoon. A partnership—which includes Parks Canada, Wanuskewin and Yellowstone National Park in the U.S.—brought the animals back. They included six female calves from Grasslands National Park, four pregnant females and a mature bull from Yellowstone National Park. “Bison almost became extinct. There were less than 1,000 animals in the late 1800s,” said University of Saskatchewan Prof. Ernest Walker. The park’s chief executive officer said bringing in the animals could help in its bid to become a UNESCO World Heritage Site and will help provide world-class programming at the park. “And the ability to draw people from all over the world to the park. Having a … species like the bison...

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